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Rivers Alliance Climate Change Priority Topics

Priority Topics

Climate Change

2017
2016
2015 
2014

 

 


Climate Change Archives                                                                            Back to Priority Topics                                                                                                                          

2017


NY Times: Earth Sets a Temperature Record for the Third Straight Year

Surface temperatures are heading toward levels that many scientists believe will pose a threat to both the natural world and to human civilization. Marking another milestone for a changing planet, scientists reported on Wednesday that the Earth reached its highest temperature on record in 2016 — trouncing a record set only a year earlier, which beat one set in 2014. It is the first time in the modern era of global warming data that temperatures have blown past the previous record three years in a row.


NY Times: How 2016 Became Earth’s Hottest Year on Record

2016 the hottest year on the historical record and the third consecutive record-breaking year, scientists say. Of the 17 hottest years ever recorded, 16 have now occurred since 2000. If human-induced climate change was not part of the equation, the amount of warming in 2016 would have less than one-in-a-million odds of occurring.


2016


State of the Climate 2015 Report Released (August, 2016)

The State of the Climate is the authoritative annual summary of the global climate published as a supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The report, compiled by NOAA’s Center for Weather and Climate at the National Centers for Environmental Information is based on contributions from scientists from around the world. It provides a detailed update on global climate indicators, notable weather events, and other data collected by environmental monitoring stations and instruments located on land, water, ice, and in space. State of the Climate in 2015 This is the 26th edition of the annual assessment now known as State of the Climate. The year 2015 saw the toppling of several symbolic mileposts: notably, it was 1.0°C warmer than preindustrial times, and the Mauna Loa observatory recorded its first annual mean carbon dioxide concentration greater than 400 ppm. Beyond these more recognizable markers, trends seen in recent decades continued.
Precipitation over the global land surface in 2015 was far below the long-term average. In fact, 2015 was the driest year on record in two prominent global products...(and) ... was also among the five driest years on record in a new (experimental) version of another prominent product... (http://ametsoc.net/sotc/Chapter_02.pdf#21 page 21 of 56))

 

 

 

Climate Change: Will We Ever Wake Up?

(2014)

On March 31, 2014, the distinguished United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report warning that climate change is affecting all parts of the world. All nations need to take immediate steps to prepare for adverse events, including floods, droughts, hunger, illness, infrastructure breakdowns, and political disruptions.

Climate Change 2014, Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. The SUMMARY FOR POLICYMAKERS

The report stressed threats to clean water as a leading global problem. The response of world powers has done little to avert this obvious and impending threat. Secretary of State State John Kerry said the report made clear that "the costs of inaction are catastrophic." Earlier in March, more than two dozen US senators, including Connecticut senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy, staged a rare all-night Senate session to draw attention to the climate crisis. Maybe it’s time for an all-nighter across the nation to demand action. We are sleeping our way into misery for ourselves and our children.

The most likely and worse effects for North America are more wildfires, deaths from heat stroke, floods. How much worse they get depends on how soon we stop the increase of greenhouse gases from burning of fossil fuels. How bad the effects of these will be depends on how well prepared we are. The rest of the world can expect much worse than North America.

Here is a graphic from the report; explanations follow.

Click for full size graphic

WILDFIRE Bar graphs for Risk and potential for adaptation: Even IF we stop greenhouse gas emissions soon enough to keep global warming to 2°C, and aggressively work to adapt our human and natural systems to prevent and prepare for fires, the long term risk at best will be lowered to the risk we now have without any adaptations for increased fires.

So why bother? If we do not, the fires will be something this planet has not seen in human history.

HEAT MORTALITY Bar graphs for Risk and potential for adaptation: IF we stop greenhouse gas emissions soon enough to keep global warming to 2°C, and aggressively work to improve the way we prepare for and respond to heat waves, the long term risk can be kept as low as it could be now if we immediately  and aggressively prepare for them.

FLOODING Bar graphs for Risk and potential for adaptation: IF we stop greenhouse gas emissions soon enough to keep global warming to 2°C, and aggressively work to improve the way we prepare for and respond to coastal flooding, the long term risk at best will be lowered to the risk we now have without any adaptations for increased frequency, intensity and duration of flood events.

Why bother? Ask Noah.

The explanations above of just one of the charts in the report interprets their bar graphs to provide a "best case scenario" for each of the most likely worst three effects of climate change here.

 


Climate Change Archives

 

 

 

 

Rivers Alliance of Connecticut
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